Navassa Island DXpedition 2015


Page last updated on: Thursday, October 30, 2014

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Navassa Island DXpedition 2015

We are pleased to announce that the new Navassa 2015 DXpedition website is up and running. It can be found at http://www.navassadx.com.

Also, it is official…our call sign will be K1N.

Team members are: AA7JV, K0IR, K4UEE, K5AC, K9CT, KT4TTT, N2OO, N2TU, N4GRN, N6MZ, NA5U, NM1Y, W0GJ, W6IZT, WB9Z.

We will update the website often as more information becomes available. We are working closely with the USFWS and are pleased with their “can do” attitude. We should have specific dates shortly, but the team has cleared their schedules to be available for the two week operation starting in late January 2015.

Fundraising has begun. If able, we encourage you to financially support the project.

73, for the DXpedition team Bob K4UEE, Glenn W0GJ, Mike NA5U

ICPO

 

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via Navassa Island DXpedition 2015.

The planned DXpedition to Navassa Island, one of the most sought after DXCC entities, is proceeding according to plan.  The two-week DXpedition will last for approximately two weeks and will be held in the later part of January 2015.  The call sign, K1N, has been secured and the new website is up at:  http://www.navassadx.com.  The radio team is comprised of disciplined, experienced contesters who perform well under pressure.  They will need all of their stamina to work the thousands of amateur radio operators desiring this rare contact with Navassa Island.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Nikola Tesla Slept Here


 

Page last updated on: Thursday, October 30, 2014

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Nikola Tesla Slept Here

Joseph Kinney, who was a radio amateur in his teens, is interviewed in an IEEE article about Nikola Tesla and the hotel in Manhattan were he lived

From 1933 until his death in 1943, Tesla lived in relative obscurity at the New Yorker Hotel. His two rooms, which still accommodate paying guests, are often requested by devotees from around the world.

Read the article at

http://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/history/nikola-tesla-slept-here

Tesla Science Center

http://www.teslasciencecenter.org/

via Nikola Tesla Slept Here.

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A fascinating article that sheds some more light on the career of Nikola Tesla, an eccentric, gifted experimental scientist who left his mark on the 20th century.  The focus of the interview is centered former amateur radio operator Joseph Kinney, who talks about Tesla and the New Yorker Hotel where Tesla spent his final days before he died in 1943.  According to Kinney, Tesla’s two rooms at the Manhattan hotel still accommodate paying guests, who wish to be in the same room where Tesla lived and created some of the marvels of the 20th century.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

DX News from the ARRL | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Friday, October 31, 2014

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The American Radio Relay League’s round-up of the forthcoming week’s DX activity

on the amateur radio bands

DX News from the ARRL

31 October, 2014

This week’s bulletin was made possible with information provided by the OPDX Bulletin, 425 DX News, The Daily DX, DXNL, Contest Corral from QST and the ARRL Contest Calendar and WA7BNM web sites. Thanks to all.

SENEGAL, 6W. Sigi, DL7DF will be QRV as DL7DF/6W from Somone from November 1 to 13 while on vacation. Activity is holiday style on 160 to 10 meters using CW, SSB, SSTV and PSK31. QSL to home call.

ALGERIA, 7X. Garti, 7X2RD, Noury, 7X2JV, and Abder, 7X4RJ will be QRV with special call 7U60AR during all of November. Activity will be on 40 to 10 meters using all modes. QSL via 7X2RD.

NEPAL, 9N. Toshi, JA8BMK is QRV as 9N7BM until November 20. Activity is holiday style on the HF bands, with a focus on 160 and 80 meters. QSL to home call.

NIUE, E6. Alan, VK4WR and Graeme, VK4FI will be QRV as E6RQ and E6SG, respectively, from Alofi, IOTA OC-040, from November 2 to 9.

Activity will be on 40 to 10 meters. QSL both calls direct via VK4FI.

BELARUS, EW. Eugene, EW3LK will be QRV from Prostyr from November 1 to 4 for the World Wide Flora and Fauna Award. Activity will be on 80 to 10 meters using CW and SSB. QSL to home call.

GUADELOUPE, FG. Special event station TO10RR will be QRV from November 2 to 16 during the 10th Route du Rhum, a 3000-mile regatta for single-handed sailors between St. Malo France and Pointe-a-Pitre Guadeloupe. QSL direct via FG8NY.

TROMELIN ISLAND, FT/T. Seb, F5UFX, Michel, FM5CD, Flo, F5CWU, Franck, F4AJQ, Fred, F5ROP and Vincent, F4BKV are QRV as FT4TA until November 10. Activity is on 160 to 6 meters using CW, SSB and RTTY with five stations active. QSL direct via F1NGP.

ITALY, I. Special event station IY1EY will be QRV from November 1 to December 31 to commemorate Marconi’s experiments from his Elettra yacht between 1919 and 1936. Activity will be on all HF bands using CW and SSB. QSL via IK1QBT.

SVALBARD, JW. Alexander, UA3IPL is QRV as JW/UA3IPL from Spitsbergen Island, IOTA EU-026, for four months. Activity is on the HF bands using CW, SSB, RTTY, PSK31 and JT65. QSL direct via RW6HS.

BELGIUM, ON. Members of club station ON4HRT are QRV as ON1418HRT during the month of November to honor the memory of World War I victims. QSL via bureau.

BRAZIL, PY. Special event station PS43GPB will be QRV from November 1 to 10 during the Grand Prix Brasil F1 Race, Interlagos Circuit from Sao Paulo. Activity will be on 20, 17, 15 and 10 meters using SSB. QSL via PS7AB.

ANTARCTICA. Oleg, ZS1ANF, Slava, RD3MX and Alex, UA1PAW are QRV as RI1ANR from Novolazarevskaya Base, IOTA AN-016, until March 2015. Activity is on 160 to 10 meters using CW and SSB. QSL via RK1PWA.

SEYCHELLES, S7. Bigi, DE3BWR and Heli, DD0VR will be QRV as S79VR from Mahe, Praslin, and La Dique Islands, IOTA AF-024, from November 3 to 30. Activity will be on 20 to 10 meters using CW and SSB. QSL via DD0VR.

NAMIBIA, V5. Sebastian, OE3SZA is QRV as V5/OE3SZA until November 11. Activity is on the HF bands using SSB and QRP power. QSL to home call.

MICRONESIA, V6. Naoki, JS3LSQ is QRV as V63WJ from Pohnpei, IOTA OC-010, until November 4. Activity is on 20 to 10 meters using SSB. QSL to home call.

ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISLANDS, VU4. Krish, W4VKU, Chetz, VU3DMP and Pai, VU2PAI will be QRV as VU4KV from Campbell Bay, IOTA AS-033, from November 3 to 13. Activity will be on the HF bands with two stations. QSL via W4KVU.

ZIMBABWE, Z2. Chris, PA2CHR, Lins, PA3CMC, John, ZS6JON, and Paul, ZS6NK will be QRV as Z21CHR, Z21CMC, Z21EME and Z21NK,  respectively, from November 1 to 8. This is an EME DXpedition and will be QRV on 6 and 2 meters, and 70 and 23 cm. QSL via PA3CMC.

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS. W1AW Centennial Stations W1AW/1 in Massachusetts, W1AW/7 in Wyoming and W1AW/KP2 in the US Virgin Islands are QRV until 2359z on November 4. In addition, W1AW/7 in Washington, W1AW/0 in Kansas and W1AW/KH8 in American Samoa will be QRV starting at 0000z on November 5. W1AW/7 and W1AW/0 will be active until 2359z on November 11. W1AW/KH8 will be active until 2359z on November 18.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO

The ARRL November CW Sweepstakes, NCCC RTTY Sprint, NCCC Sprint, IPARC CW Contest, Himalayan Contest, Ukrainian DX Contest, North American Collegiate ARC CW Championship, IPARC SSB Contest, High Speed Club CW Contest and the DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest will certainly keep contesters busy this upcoming weekend.

The ARS Spartan CW Sprint is scheduled for November 4.

The CWops Mini-CWT Test is scheduled for November 5.

Please see November QST, page 86 and the ARRL and WA7BNM contest web sites for details

 

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via DX News from the ARRL | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Here’s the latest DX news from the ARRL.  In addition to noting some exotic DX for November, there is also a list of upcoming activities and special event stations that will be active over the next few weeks.  The report also list some of the popular contests scheduled for this weekend, including the ARRL November CW Sweepstakes, NCCC RTTY Sprint, IPARC CW Contest, the Himalayan Contest, the Ukrainian DX Contest, and the DARC 10 Meter Digital Contest. This will be a busy weekend for contest enthusiasts. For more details, check out the November issue of “QST”, page 86 and the WA7BNW contest site.  Good DX to all!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014, balloon launch successful.


Colorado EOSS-202 Balloon Flight Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads “Awesome”

An Edge of Space Sciences (EOSS) balloon flight, launched on October 25 by students from Colorado and New Mexico, and carrying three ham radio payloads into near-space surpassed its planned altitude. The mission, designated EOSS-202, took off under a clear sky from Deer Trail, Colorado. The Douglas County, Colorado, STEM School and STEM Academy and Spartan Amateur Radio Club, AB0BX, sponsored and coordinated the balloon flight.

“It was awesome,” said Paul Veal, N0AH, a Rocky Mountain Division Assistant Director and AB0X trustee. “It was simply the best weather any of us could have hoped for. According to EOSS, our flight reached one of the highest altitudes they’ve had in years — nearly 104,000 feet!”

Veal said a large number of young students participated “with great enthusiasm throughout the morning cold at sunrise throughout the heat of the day.” Several of the more than 2 dozen students taking part in the project are radio amateurs.

The “AB0BX Spartan Space Sciences” mission carried seven student-designed payloads aloft. All payloads were retrieved after the balloon burst, at first tumbling and then descending gently to Earth borne by a parachute. Video from the ground was able to capture the balloon’s burst as it attained its maximum altitude. The onboard ham radio payloads served to track the balloon during flight and recovery and also transmitted telemetry during the mission.

Veal said the only major snafu involved the onboard Go-Pro cameras, which were equipped with 8 GB cards. “We really needed 32 GB [cards], so we got awesome pictures but only up to around 80,000 feet,” he explained.

Veal said a parent-led chase team convoy was able to see with the naked eye the sun’s light reflecting from the balloon when it was more than 84,000 feet up. “This included several parents and students who tagged along in 13 vehicles — around 50 of us altogether.” The balloon traveled more than 70 miles, 19 more than predicted.

“The farming-ranching community in and around the recovery area near Cope, Colorado, gladly helped us to recover the balloon on private land,” Veal said. “All payloads were recovered with no serious damage.”

“Data from the various experiments, along with photos and videos from EOSS and spectators, will be collected in the next few weeks,” said Veal. “I am hoping that the school can create a student team to formulate a digital book to count toward credit.” As a result of the balloon project, he said, several project-based lesson plans for grades 6 through 12 can be formulated along STEM standards.

via The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014.

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Amateur Radio is playing a huge part of high-altitude balloon launches around the world.  The Colorado EOSS flight on 25 October 2014 was a complete success.  These flights are often part of a student-designed CubeSat later on.  According to Paul Veal (N0AH), the ” Data from the various experiments, along with photos and videos from EOSS and spectators, will be collected in the next few weeks…to formulate a digital book to count toward credit.”  Great job by all involved.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014


Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion

The RACE and GOMX-2 CubeSats, both carrying Amateur Radio payloads, were among more than 2 dozen satellites lost after an unmanned Orbital Space Sciences (OSC) Antares 130 vehicle exploded spectacularly shortly after launch at 2222 UTC on Tuesday, October 28, from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. The Antares is a new medium-class launch vehicle developed by OSC. The rocket exploded about 6 seconds after launch, sending a huge ball of fire hurtling toward the ground and igniting a massive fire at the NASA launch site.

“While NASA is disappointed that Orbital Sciences’ third contracted resupply mission to the International Space Station was not successful today, we will continue to move forward toward the next attempt once we fully understand today’s mishap,” said William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator of NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Directorate. “The crew of the International Space Station is in no danger of running out of food or other critical supplies.” Indeed, a smaller resupply mission, launched from Russia, reached the ISS the next day.

The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment (RACE) CubeSat was a joint project of The Texas Spacecraft Laboratory (TSL) at the University of Texas-Austin and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Built by a 30-student team, it carried a 183 GHz radiometer, a new science instrument designed by JPL. The spacecraft was equipped to transmit using GMSK at 38.4 k and CW telemetry on a downlink frequency of 437.525MHz.

TSL’s Glenn Lightsey, KE5DDG, a UT engineering professor, oversaw the student project that worked hand-in-hand with NASA staff in creating a satellite that aimed to measure water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere.

“It’s unfortunate, but it is also part of the aerospace industry,” Lightsey told the Texas Statesman newspaper. “The nature of building space vehicles is that it is not a 100 percent reliable process. Getting into space is really the hardest part.”

The 2U GOMX-2 CubeSat was intended to test a de-orbit system designed by Aalborg University in Denmark. Karl Klaus Laursen, OZ2KK, is listed as the “responsible operator” on International Amateur Radio Union frequency coordination documents. The Amateur Radio payload proposed using a 9.6 k MSK data downlink on 437.250 MHz. Also on board was an optical communications experiment from the National University of Singapore. The mission also aimed to flight qualify a new high-speed UHF transceiver and SDR receiver built by an Aalborg University team.

The Antares 130 resupply mission was carrying some 5000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station. The Antares 130 also was carrying the Flock-1d array of 26 satellites as well as Arkyd-3 and Cygnus CRS-3. RACE, GOMX-2, and the other satellites were to be launched into orbit from the ISS later.

via The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014.

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Here’s more information on the launch pad explosion that destroyed an Orbital Space Services Antares 130 rocket.  Although no human casualties were reported, several amateur radio CubeSats were lost, including RACE and GOMX-2.  The Antares vehicle was also carrying supplies for the International Space Station.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Army, Air Force MARS Merge Nets


N1IN

 

Army, Air Force MARS Merge Nets

During a 48 hour DOD sponsored contingency communications exercise which began on 26 October and ended Tuesday evening the Army and Air Force branches of the MARS merged their long-distance radio networks in order to provide communications support following a simulated disruption to the nation’s communications infrastructure. In addition to passing message traffic for the DOD, the scenario also required the MARS stations to interface with the Department of Homeland Security SHARed RESources HF network.

Another objective of the exercise required the MARS operators to reach out to the amateur radio community and attempt to contact amateur radio operators (Hams) in as many counties across the United States as possible. Regarding this objective Army MARS Program Manager Paul English explained, “This communications exercise is sponsored by the DoD to provide MARS operators the opportunity to develop and train interoperability procedures with their state/local ARES emergency coordinators and their Amateur Radio colleagues.”

The plan called for MARS members, using their Amateur Radio call signs and operating on amateur frequencies, to establish two-way communication with Amateur Radio emergency Service (ARES) leadership or members in as many U.S. counties as possible by using VHF/UHF simplex channels or local repeaters or near vertical incidence skywave (NVIS) propagation on HF. “The contact can be with any amateur in the county, if an ARES member or leader is not available,” English added.

“In order to better support [our] new mission, both Army and Air Force MARS are looking for efficiencies in how we conduct our national nets,” Army MARS Chief Stephen Klinefelter said. ”This National Exercise is the perfect venue to test out this new relationship. We will make mistakes and we will improve by learning from those mistakes.”

“Dave Stapchuk, Chief Air Force MARS, commented: “Interoperability is key to mission success. This joint exercise is the first step toward demonstrating that we can be truly interoperable in support of our mission and DoD customer. It also strengthens the operational linkages between our MARS Services and highlights the growing relevance of the contingency communications service we provide to the military and the nation. While there are many challenges to overcome and lessons to be learned, I am optimistic that we will steadily improve our abilities over time thanks to the dedication and commitment of our volunteer members.”

via Army, Air Force MARS Merge Nets.

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Thanks to N1IN for this MARS report.  Hopefully, we can see more interoperability tests between MARS operators and the amateur radio community.  MARS is another part of the emergency communications network of the Department of Defense, with many MARS operators being licensed amateur radio operators. Dave Stepchuk, the Chief of Air Force MARS, says, “This joint exercise is the first step toward demonstrating that we can be truly interoperable in support of our mission and DoD customer…(it) highlghts the growing relevance of the contingency communications service we provide to the military and the nation.”

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM.

Hawaii ARES Volunteers Firming Up Plans for Possible Lava Flow Activation


Hawaii ARES Volunteers Firming Up Plans for Possible Lava Flow Activation

TAGS: amateur radio, ARRL Pacific Section, Big Island, conventional telecommunication systems, emergency operations center, Ham Aid kits, Hurricane Ana, lava flow, Manager Bob Schneider, radio emergency service

10/29/2014

Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) volunteers on the Big Island of Hawaii are putting plans in place in case they need to activate in response to the Puna lava flow, reported today (October 29) to be 100 yards from the nearest home and with another 40 to 50 homes in its path. On October 28, the lava claimed its first structure — a shed in Pahoa. The lava originated from new “vents” in the Earth as a result of the Mt Kilauea volcano, which began erupting more than 30 years ago. After grinding to a halt nearly a month ago, the lava flow recently resumed its slow and devastating crawl toward populated areas. Residents in the path of the flow have been notified of a possible need to evacuate, and an evacuation advisory for down-slope residents remains in effect.

Lava flows are nothing new to many Hawaiians; ARRL Pacific Section Manager Bob Schneider, AH6J, has called them “a slow-motion disaster.” In September ARRL deployed Ham Aid kits to Hawaii for a possible lava flow response then. As it turned out, ARES members there needed the gear for Hurricane Ana first, since the lava flow had abated by the time the equipment got to Hawaii.

 

via Hawaii ARES Volunteers Firming Up Plans for Possible Lava Flow Activation.

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According to ARRL Pacific Section Manager Bob Schneider (AH6J), ARES volunteers are firming up plans in case they are activated by Hawaii County Civil Defense in response to a lava flow that threatens to cover parts of Pahoa on Hawaii Island.  The ARRL-deployed “Ham Aid Kits” sent to Hawaii Island in September were first used during the Hurricane Ana emergency, and will now be used to support emergency communications during the lava flow danger.  We lead exciting lives in the Central Pacific–two hurricanes, some earthquakes, and now a lava flow–all within a span of two months.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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