Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Thursday, October 9, 2014

Source: Southgate Amateur Radio Club News.

 

Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band

Ofcom has today granted an indefinite extension to the spectrum licence held by UK Broadband Ltd within the 3.4 GHz band.

The decision follows a consultation, which considered the benefits to consumers that are likely to arise if the licence is extended and UK Broadband goes ahead with investment in a new broadband network.

Ofcom believes that extending the licence will promote competition and encourage investment and innovation. Among the potential benefits, we expect UK Broadband’s investment to deliver faster broadband speeds to customers and at lower prices, in under-served urban areas.

UK Broadband’s licence includes 40 MHz of spectrum within a total of 190 MHz of spectrum suitable for broadband use in the 3.4 GHz band.

The future auction of the other 150 MHz of spectrum at 3.4 GHz means that alternative operators will still have an opportunity to obtain spectrum in this band.

via Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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The rising demand for broadband spectrum is squeezing amateur radio operators in both the U.S. and the UK out of shared frequencies in the 3.4 GHz band. In its consultation report, UK telecommunications regulator, Ofcom, said the reassignment of 3.4 GHz spectrum will encourage “investment and innovation” in delivering high-speed internet to customers in “underserved urban areas.”  UK Broadband’s license “includes 40 MHz of spectrum with a total of 190 MHz of spectrum suitable for broadband use in the 3.4 GHz band.”  This competition for available spectrum reminds me of the frequency battles of the early 1920’s when commercial services tried to assume control over spectrum granted to amateur radio operators.  A good account of this struggle can be found in Clinton DeSoto’s book, “200 Meters and Down.”  It appears history is repeating itself, but this time the struggle has moved from HF to the UHF and SHF bands.  Just follow the money trail.  Enjoy the spectrum you have–it may be taken away anytime by something more important, such as mobile phones, mobile gaming, high-speed internet, or even vehicle avoidance radar.  I have a weird feeling that amateur radio may be returning to the MW and LF ranges one of these days, as AM broadcast radio is phased out in favor of 88-108 MHz FM stations.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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