Indian Radio Amateurs Continue Communication Support Following Cyclone


Indian Radio Amateurs Continue Communication Support Following Cyclone

TAGS: amateur radio, amateur radio society, authorities, Chairman IARU Region, coastal areas, Communication Jayu Bhide, communication support, Disaster Communications Committee, immediate aftermath, Jim Linton, mobile towers, National Coordinator, National Institute, radio emergency communication, wind gusts

10/27/2014

More than 2 weeks after Cyclone (hurricane) Hud Hud hit Vishakhapattanam and surrounding communities on India’s Bay of Bengal, radio amateurs are continuing to provide communication support to authorities and residents. In the storm’s immediate aftermath, all communication with Vishakhapattanam  — known as “Vizag” and the wider region was via Amateur Radio. Without electric power knocked out, no mobile or landline telephone service was available, but Amateur Radio Society of India (ARSI) National Coordinator for Disaster Communication Jayu Bhide, VU2JAU, said the Amateur Radio emergency communication network ran smoothly. Bhide told ARRL that it will take some time before things are back to normal in the stricken region.

“The debris is getting cleared [and] rehabilitation is in progress,” he reported over the weekend. A half-dozen radio amateurs from Odissa have been assisting both authorities and the public on communication. Bhide said a few stations working under the National Institute of Amateur Radio (NIAR) banner have set up to assist with police and other administrative communication needs.

“The landline telephones are under repair, and part of [the system] has started working,” Bhide said. “Mobile towers also are under repair and will be in working condition soon.” He said authorities have been working hard to make drinking water available to the public.

Upward of 4 dozen lives were lost after the powerful storm made landfall on October 12, causing severe flooding in three coastal areas and forcing thousands to take shelter one of some 300 relief camps. Wind gusts were estimated at up to 130 MPH. — Thanks to Jayu Bhide, VU2JAU, and Jim Linton, VK3PC, Chairman IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee

via Indian Radio Amateurs Continue Communication Support Following Cyclone.

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Some more background on the emergency communications support rendered by Indian amateur radio operators following the passing of Cyclone Hudhud.  More than two weeks after the storm, Indian hams are still at their posts sending and receiving emergency traffic and helping to coordinate relief efforts with government agencies.  Cyclone Hudhud pounded communities along the Bay of Bengal with 130 mph winds, caused widespread damage, and killed 48 people.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

15-year-old helps save the day – The Hindu


15-year-old helps save the day

“Canon vs Nikon:” – Which is better? Here is the truth one of them doesnt want you to know uglyhedgehog.com

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The Hindu Executive Vice-chairman and Director of National Institute of Amateur Radio S. Ram Mohan and Tom K Jose of Hyderabad who played an active role in the relief works of the recent Hudhud Cyclone. Photo: Nagara Gopal

The Hindu Tom K Jose of Hyderabad who played his part in the relief operations post the Hudhud Cyclone which ravaged the north Andhra Pradesh. Photo: Nagara Gopal

TOPICS

Andhra Pradesh

Hyderabad

Visakhapatnam

India

Andhra Pradesh

computing and information technology

communication infrastructure

telecommunication service

wireless technology

disaster and accident

natural disasters

natural disasters

cyclones

windstorms

Uses his Ham radio skills to gather vital information during Hudhud. One contact talked about trees falling at a Jain temple in Bhimli and resulting in precarious conditions. The young Ham immediately passed on the information to senior officials, who in turn directed their field personnel.

For a week, Tom K. Jose kept his studies aside, travelled to a cyclone-hit city and used his Ham radio skills to contribute to disaster management.

When Hudhud swept through Visakhapatnam disrupting its communication network and a team of amateur radio (Ham) operators from the city were sought, the 15-year-old student of Little Flower Junior College, Uppal, volunteered for the task.

With his call sign, VU3TMO, Tom was stationed in the control room set up at Visakhapatnam Police Commissionerate and spent long hours collecting messages from other team members spread over the cyclone affected areas and passed them on to the administration for relief measures.

The intermediate first year student, who got his Ham licence at the age of 13, along with colleagues, operated under adverse conditions, often skipping meals and spending long hours before the radio, waiting for it to crackle with messages. “For seven days, I was at the Visakhapatnam Police Commissionerate and one day at the District Collector’s office at Srikakulam and made anywhere up to 500 contacts,” says Tom.

One contact talked about trees falling at a Jain temple in Bhimli and resulting in precarious conditions. The young Ham immediately passed on the information to senior officials, who in turn directed their field personnel, and the situation was attended to. Another was a contact from Bangalore who was desperately trying to locate his brother and sister in the Hudhud affected area. “We operated without checking the watch or caring whether it was day or night. We had to just sit in front of the radio and wait for a contact,” he says.

Tom, who got his licence when he was in class 9, explores the Ham world and so far, has contacted more than 150 countries and received appreciations for his operational skills from Ham associations from different parts of the globe, including US, Germany and Japan. He comfortably juggles his hobby with studies and says, “Each night after studies I spend 30 minutes to 45 minutes with the radio apart from a brief tryst in the morning before going to college.”

Keywords: Ham Radio, Cyclone Hudhud relief, Rescue operations, Andhra Pradesh, 15-year-old

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via 15-year-old helps save the day – The Hindu.

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Nice story from http://thehindu.com praising the emergency service of 15-year-old amateur radio operator Tom K. Jose (VU3TMO) during the passing of Cyclone Hudhud.  The young student spent 7 straight days relaying messages out of the storm ravaged area to government officials who dispatched aid and rescue teams.  According to India media, the cyclone severely disrupted communications in several areas.  Jose volunteered to serve as an emergency communications link while disaster aid poured into the affected area.  Indian hams have rendered valuable communications assistance during a busy storm year for the sub-continent.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are unpdated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Radio hams providing emergency comms from Vizag | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Radio hams providing emergency comms from Vizag

Upon request from the Police Dept., Govt. of Andhra Pradesh, members of the National Institute of Amateur Radio (NIAR), Hyderabad are providing emergency communications from the cyclone Hudhud affected areas of Visakhapatnam

Those NIAR members involved are:

1. Mr.S.Suri, VU2MY

2. Mr.S.Ram Mohan, VU2MYH

3. Ms.S.Yamini, VU2YAM

4. Mr.Mukesh Kumar Gola, VU2MCW

5. Mr. K.Leela Krishna, VU2SZG

6. Mr.Tom K. Jose, VU3TMO

Assisted by:

7. Mr. Ramesh Kuthumbaka, SWL

8. Mr.S.V.B.Ramu, SWL

They are also joined by:

9. Mr.Ambarish Naag Biswas, VU2JFA

Assisted by:

10. Mr.Asit Kumar Das, SWL

The ham control room is established at office of Commissioner of Police, Visakhapatnam and they are operating on HF & VHF. More stations are being set up. They also met Mr.Chandra Babu Naidu, Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh and appraised him of the Amateur Radio emergency communications.

NIAR HQ Station, Hyderabad , VU2NRO is operated by:

– Ms.M.Bhanumathy, VU2BL

– Mr.Jose Jacob, VU2JOS

– Ms.Lissy Jose, VU3LMS

– Mr.Md.Mujeebuddin, VU3MHI

Frequencies: 7090 kHz LSB, 14160 kHz USB, 145.200 MHz FM

National Institute of Amateur Radio (NIAR)

http://www.niar.org/

https://www.facebook.com/NIAR.org

via Radio hams providing emergency comms from Vizag | Southgate Amateur Radio News

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According to India’s National Institute of Amateur Radio (NIAR), amateur radio operators are providing emergency communications for the  Andhra Pradesh area of India following the passage of Cyclone Hudhud.  Indian hams are working closely with local government and police personnel to keep emergency communications links open during the aftermath of the storm which impacted areas near the Bay of Bengal.  Indian hams have had their hands full recently, providing communications help during cyclones, earthquakes, and country-wide flooding.  Be sure to keep these frequencies open for emergency traffic:

 

7.090 MHz LSB, 14.160 MHz USB, and 145.200 MHz FM.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Communication outages filled by Indian hams | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Monday, October 13, 2014

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Communication outages filled by Indian hams

When the powerful Cyclone Hudhud swept into the Bay of Bengal coastal areas of India disaster authorities called on radio amateurs to help out.

National Coordinator for Disaster Communication, Jayu Bhide VU2JAU said, “In Odissa there are six hams working hard to maintain the communication covering the state.

“The effect of Hudhud is now reduced and few deaths have been reported.”

The media claimed that at least six deaths had occurred.

That was good news for Odissa because locals feared the bad weather could be a repeat of the very severe storm Phailin in 2013.

Before Hudhud with winds up to 200 km/h made landfall damaging buildings, power systems and the loss of communication in many areas, thousands of people were evacuated to shelters.

While the worst of strong winds and heavy rain is over, the cyclone can still cause flash flooding and further damage. A full assessment must wait until the storm moves completely on.

Jayu VU2JAU said that active from the Bhuvaneshwar area are Preeti VU3UFX, Rajesh VU3PLP and Samir VU2AOR.

In the Sambalpur area are Dilip VU2DPI who is control of a network of Shantanu VU2SIC and Pawan VU2PGU.

These have been on air using 7140 MHz and have kept their stations open 24 hours a day.

In the Andhra coastal area the total communication is handled by the National Institute of Amateur Radio, and is now under control.

Jayu VU2JAU from the IARU member Amateur Radio Society of India (ARSI), is monitoring emergency traffic from his home QTH in Gwalior.

 

Jim Linton VK3PC

Chairman

IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee

 

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via Communication outages filled by Indian hams | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Excellent article from Jim Linton (VK3PC), Chairman, IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee, on how amateur radio operators in India are handling emergency communications following the passing of  Cyclone Hudhud.  Government officials have asked for communications support and Indian hams have volunteered to provide this vital service.  I know it sounds trite, but “when all else fails, there’s Amateur Radio” is more than just a catchy slogan for many hams around the world.  In India, amateur radio operators have been a vital communications lifeline in and out of disaster areas.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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