NASA statement on successful Rosetta comet landing


Page last updated on: Thursday, November 13, 2014

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NASA statement on successful Rosetta comet landing

The following statement is from John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, about the successful comet landing by the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft:

“We congratulate ESA on their successful landing on a comet today. This achievement represents a breakthrough moment in the exploration of our solar system and a milestone for international cooperation. We are proud to be a part of this historic day and look forward to receiving valuable data from the three NASA instruments on board Rosetta that will map the comet’s nucleus and examine it for signs of water.

“The data collected by Rosetta will provide the scientific community, and the world, with a treasure-trove of data. Small bodies in our solar system like comets and asteroids help us understand how the solar system formed and provide opportunities to advance exploration. We look forward to building on Rosetta’s success exploring our solar system through our studies of near earth asteroids and NASA’s upcoming asteroid sample return mission OSIRIS-REx. It’s a great day for space exploration.”

For information about NASA’s role in the Rosetta mission, visit:

http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/

To learn more about NASA’s asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-Rex, visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/osiris-rex/

 

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via NASA statement on successful Rosetta comet landing.

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Nice congratulatory message from NASA, which has 3 scientific experiments on the Rosetta space probe.  Quite an accomplishment by the European Space Agency.

For the lateste Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Rosetta to deploy lander on 12 November | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Monday, September 29, 2014

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Rosetta to deploy lander on 12 November

The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission will deploy its lander, Philae, to the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 12 November.

Philae’s landing site, currently known as Site J, is located on the smaller of the comet’s two ‘lobes’, with a backup site on the larger lobe. The sites were selected just six weeks after Rosetta arrived at the comet on 6 August, following its 10-year journey through the Solar System.

In that time, the Rosetta mission has been conducting an unprecedented scientific analysis of the comet, a remnant of the Solar System’s 4.6 billion-year history. The latest results from Rosetta will be presented on the occasion of the landing, during dedicated press briefings.

The main focus to date has been to survey 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in order to prepare for the first ever attempt to soft-land on a comet.

Site J was chosen unanimously over four other candidate sites as the primary landing site because the majority of terrain within a square kilometre area has slopes of less than 30º relative to the local vertical and because there are relatively few large boulders. The area also receives sufficient daily illumination to recharge Philae and continue surface science operations beyond the initial 64-hour battery-powered phase.

Over the last two weeks, the flight dynamics and operations teams at ESA have been making a detailed analysis of flight trajectories and timings for Rosetta to deliver the lander at the earliest possible opportunity.

Two robust landing scenarios have been identified, one for the primary site and one for the backup. Both anticipate separation and landing on 12 November.

For the primary landing scenario, targeting Site J, Rosetta will release Philae at 08:35 GMT/09:35 CET at a distance of 22.5 km from the centre of the comet, landing about seven hours later. The one-way signal travel time between Rosetta and Earth on 12 November is 28 minutes 20 seconds, meaning that confirmation of the landing will arrive at Earth ground stations at around 16:00 GMT/17:00 CET.

If a decision is made to use the backup Site C, separation will occur at 13:04 GMT/14:04 CET, 12.5 km from the centre of the comet. Landing will occur about four hours later, with confirmation on Earth at around 17:30 GMT/18:30 CET. The timings are subject to uncertainties of several minutes.

Final confirmation of the primary landing site and its landing scenario will be made on 14 October after a formal Lander Operations Readiness Review, which will include the results of additional high-resolution analysis of the landing sites conducted in the meantime. Should the backup site be chosen at this stage, landing can still occur on 12 November.

A competition for the public to name the primary landing site will also be announced during the week of 14 October.

The Rosetta orbiter will continue to study the comet and its environment using its 11 science instruments as they orbit the Sun together. The comet is on an elliptical 6.5-year orbit that takes it from beyond Jupiter at its furthest point, to between the orbits of Mars and Earth at its closest to the Sun. Rosetta will accompany the comet for more than a year as they swing around the Sun and back to the outer Solar System again.

The analyses made by the Rosetta orbiter will be complemented by the in situ measurements performed by Philae’s 10 instruments.

 

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via Rosetta to deploy lander on 12 November | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Here’s the recent update on the European Space Agency’s Rosetta Mission to comet 67P/Curyumov-Gerasimenko.  After a 10-year journey, the Rosetta space probe will land on one two preselected landing sites on the space rock.  Scientists hope the probe will tell us something about the nature of the early universe.  The Rosetta probe is set to deploy the lander package on 12 November 2014.

For the latest in Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

HAM Video Premieres on the Space Station


See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

Astronauts on the International Space Station can now talk with people on Earth with video using simple transmitters. (Hey amateur radio enthusiasts, we now have #HAM TV on space station!

Russ Roberts‘s insight:

The new Ham TV station on board the International Space Station (ISS) became operational on 12 April 2014.  NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins had the honor of being the “first to commission the video and broadcast over Ham TV.”  The new amateur radio television station will add a “visual dimension” to ARISS programs. Schoolchildren will be able to see and hear astrounauts in with simple equipment.  Great program for the students!  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on www.nasa.gov

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