NASA coverage of fifth SpaceX resupply mission to space station


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Page last updated on: Thursday, November 27, 2014

 

 

NASA coverage of fifth SpaceX resupply mission to space station

The fifth SpaceX cargo mission to the International Space Station (ISS) under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract is scheduled to launch Tuesday, Dec. 16, from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 1:15 p.m. EST.

The company’s Falcon 9 rocket will lift off at 2:31 p.m., carrying its Dragon cargo spacecraft. It is loaded with more than 3,700 pounds of scientific experiments, technology demonstrations and supplies, including critical materials to support 256 science and research investigations that will take place on the space station during ISS Expeditions 42 and 43.

In addition to launch coverage, NASA also will host a series of prelaunch news conferences Monday, Dec. 15 at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. All briefings, which are subject to a change in time, will air live on NASA TV and the agency’s website.

The mission, designated SpaceX CRS-5, is the fifth of 12 SpaceX flights NASA contracted with the company to resupply the space station. It will be the sixth trip by a Dragon spacecraft to the orbiting laboratory.

Seen here is SpaceX’s uncrewed Dragon cargo spacecraft docked to the International Space Station with a load of supplies and equipment for the station crew. Image Credit: NASA

The science research aboard the Dragon includes the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), which will characterize and measure the worldwide distribution of clouds and aerosols — the tiny particles that make up haze, dust, air pollutants and smoke; model organism research using fruit flies to study the biological effects of spaceflight; and, a new study using flatworms to better understand wound healing in space.

During panel discussions Monday at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., scientists and researchers will discuss the onboard science and research studies, including CATS and supplies for research on the risks of in-flight infections in astronauts, as well as research on degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

The series of briefings Monday will conclude with a prelaunch news conference at 2 p.m. A post-launch briefing will be held approximately 90 minutes after liftoff Tuesday.

NASA TV also will provide live coverage of the arrival of the Dragon cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station Thursday, Dec. 18. Grapple and berthing coverage will begin at about 4:30 a.m. with grapple at approximately 6 a.m. Berthing coverage begins at 7:30 a.m.

The Dragon spacecraft will remain attached to the space station’s Harmony module for more than four weeks and then splash down in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Baja California, bringing with it almost two tons of experiment samples and equipment from the station.

For NASA TV schedule and video streaming information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

 

 

 

 

 

 

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via NASA coverage of fifth SpaceX resupply mission to space station.

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The launch of the SpaceX resupply mission to the International Space Station will be covered live on NASA tv and on the agency’s website.  Broadcast coverage will begin on Tuesday, 16 December 2014 at 1:15 p.m. EST, with liftoff set for 2:31 p.m. EST.  NASA will also provide tv coverage of pre-launch news conferences on Monday, 15 December 2014.  For details, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Message to US Educators


EducatorsDavid Jordan, AA4KN, has issued a reminder that the deadline for submitting your ARISS school contact proposals is December 15, 2014.  For more information, please see: http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2014/october/ariss_us_accepting_proposals_to_host_scheduled_iss_contacts_in_2015.htm

via Message to US Educators.

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Just a quick reminder to school teachers supporting the ARISS school program:  Your contact proposal is due 15 December 2014.  A contact with the International Space Station is a good way to introduce Amateur Radio, science, and mathematics to your school.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014


Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion

The RACE and GOMX-2 CubeSats, both carrying Amateur Radio payloads, were among more than 2 dozen satellites lost after an unmanned Orbital Space Sciences (OSC) Antares 130 vehicle exploded spectacularly shortly after launch at 2222 UTC on Tuesday, October 28, from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. The Antares is a new medium-class launch vehicle developed by OSC. The rocket exploded about 6 seconds after launch, sending a huge ball of fire hurtling toward the ground and igniting a massive fire at the NASA launch site.

“While NASA is disappointed that Orbital Sciences’ third contracted resupply mission to the International Space Station was not successful today, we will continue to move forward toward the next attempt once we fully understand today’s mishap,” said William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator of NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Directorate. “The crew of the International Space Station is in no danger of running out of food or other critical supplies.” Indeed, a smaller resupply mission, launched from Russia, reached the ISS the next day.

The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment (RACE) CubeSat was a joint project of The Texas Spacecraft Laboratory (TSL) at the University of Texas-Austin and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Built by a 30-student team, it carried a 183 GHz radiometer, a new science instrument designed by JPL. The spacecraft was equipped to transmit using GMSK at 38.4 k and CW telemetry on a downlink frequency of 437.525MHz.

TSL’s Glenn Lightsey, KE5DDG, a UT engineering professor, oversaw the student project that worked hand-in-hand with NASA staff in creating a satellite that aimed to measure water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere.

“It’s unfortunate, but it is also part of the aerospace industry,” Lightsey told the Texas Statesman newspaper. “The nature of building space vehicles is that it is not a 100 percent reliable process. Getting into space is really the hardest part.”

The 2U GOMX-2 CubeSat was intended to test a de-orbit system designed by Aalborg University in Denmark. Karl Klaus Laursen, OZ2KK, is listed as the “responsible operator” on International Amateur Radio Union frequency coordination documents. The Amateur Radio payload proposed using a 9.6 k MSK data downlink on 437.250 MHz. Also on board was an optical communications experiment from the National University of Singapore. The mission also aimed to flight qualify a new high-speed UHF transceiver and SDR receiver built by an Aalborg University team.

The Antares 130 resupply mission was carrying some 5000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station. The Antares 130 also was carrying the Flock-1d array of 26 satellites as well as Arkyd-3 and Cygnus CRS-3. RACE, GOMX-2, and the other satellites were to be launched into orbit from the ISS later.

via The ARRL Letter, October 30, 2014.

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Here’s more information on the launch pad explosion that destroyed an Orbital Space Services Antares 130 rocket.  Although no human casualties were reported, several amateur radio CubeSats were lost, including RACE and GOMX-2.  The Antares vehicle was also carrying supplies for the International Space Station.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Satellite Carrying Amateur Radio Payload Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion


Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion

TAGS: amateur radio, Amateur Radio payload, international amateur radio, international space station, NASA TV, sdr receiver

10/28/2014

The GOMX-2 and RACE CubeSats were among more than 2 dozen satellites that were lost after an unmanned Orbital Space Sciences (OSC) Antares 130 vehicle exploded spectacularly shortly after launch at 2222 UTC on Tuesday, October 28, from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport on Wallops Island on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Both satellite packages carried payloads that operated on Amateur Radio frequencies. The Antares is a new medium-class launch vehicle developed by OSC. The rocket exploded about 6 seconds after launch, sending a huge ball of fire hurtling toward the ground, which set a massive fire at the NASA launch site.

“A mishap has occurred at pad 0A,” a launch conductor said during the live broadcast on NASA TV. “There is no indication there is personnel in danger, although we do have significant property damage and significant vehicle damage.”

The 2U GMX-2 CubeSat was intended to test a de-orbit system designed by Aalborg University in Denmark. Karl Klaus Laursen, OZ2KK, is listed as the “responsible operator” on International Amateur Radio Union frequency coordination documents. The Amateur Radio payload proposed using a 9.6 k MSK data downlink on 437.250 MHz. Also on board was an optical communications experiment from the National University of Singapore. The mission also hoped to flight qualify a new high-speed UHF transceiver and SDR receiver built by an Aalborg University team.

The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment (RACE) CubeSat was a joint project between The Texas Spacecraft Laboratory (TSL) at the University of Texas-Austin and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). It carried a 183 GHz radiometer, a new science instrument designed by JPL. The primary objective of the RACE mission was to collect atmospheric water vapor measurements. The spacecraft was equipped to transmit using GMSK at 38.4 k and CW telemetry on a downlink frequency of 437.525MHz, as coordinated with the IARU. TSL’s Edgar Glenn Lightsey, KE5DDG, was listed in the IARU coordination documents as the responsible operator.

The Antares 130 launcher was on a resupply mission, carrying some 5000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station. GOMX-2 and the other satellites onboard the rocket were to be launched into orbit from the International Space Station.

The Antares 130 also was carrying the Flock-1d array of 26 satellites as well as Arkyd-3, Cygnus CRS-3, and the RACE CubeSat.

via Satellite Carrying Amateur Radio Payload Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion.

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This was not a good day for Orbital Space Sciences, as its Antares 130 launch vehicle exploded today (Tuesday, 28 October 2014) shortly after leaving its launch pad at Wallops Island, Virginia.  The Antares vehicle carried a number of commercial and amateur radio satellites, including The GOMX-2 and the RACE CubeSat.  The Antares 130 was also carrying supplies for the International Space Station.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

HamTV reception with a low gain antenna | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Friday, October 17, 2014

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HamTV reception with a low gain antenna

Tonino Giagnacovo IZ8YRR conducted an experiment with a low gain antenna during the commissioning of the Ham Video system on the International Space Station (ISS) earlier this year

He has written a 10-page article on his experiment which can be read at

http://www.ariss-eu.org/HAMTV_IZ8YRR_1.pdf

Read more about the ISS Ham Video system on the ARISS-EU site at

http://www.ariss-eu.org/

via HamTV reception with a low gain antenna | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Great article by Tonino Giagnacovo (IZ8YRR) on low gain HamTV antennas on board the International Space Station (ISS).  Sometimes, simple is best.  This post also connects you to a more extensive article about the ISS Ham Video system.

For the latest developments in Amateur Radio news and events, please refer to the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

UK ISS school contacts postponed | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Sunday, September 21, 2014

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UK ISS school contacts postponed

The planned contacts between astronaut Alexander Gerst KF5ONO on the ISS and pupils at Winter Gardens Primary School, Canvey Island, Essex and Pilton Bluecoat School, Barnstaple, Devon on Tuesday have been postponed

The SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying SpinSat and its amateur radio payload to the ISS had been due to take place early Saturday morning. Due to bad weather the launch was delayed until Sunday morning which has had a knock-on effect on the planned schools contacts.

John AG9D posted:

ARISS Contact Tuesday POSTPONED

Sent: 21 September 2014 19:55

Due to the one day delay of the Space X launch, berthing day now falls on Tuesday and has resulted in the cancellation of the Winter Gardens Primary School, Canvey Island and Pilton Bluecoat School, Barnstaple, United Kingdom

73, John – AG9D

ARISS Audio

AMSAT-UK http://amsat-uk.org/

 

 

 

via UK ISS school contacts postponed | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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A bit of bad luck for some UK schools scheduled to talk with the International Space Station.  Perhaps the contacts can be rescheduled for a later date.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

International Space Station Fast Facts – CNN.com


(CNN) — Here’s a look at what you need to know about the International Space Station (ISS), a spacecraft built by a partnership of 16 nations.

The 16 nations are the United States, Canada, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

At full capacity, the almost one-million-pound space station will include six laboratories and provide more research space than any spacecraft ever built. There will be enough living space for a crew of seven.

Information on ISS crews and expeditions can be found here.

Statistics (as of June 2014) Source: NASA

The ISS includes three main modules connected by nodes: the U.S. Laboratory Module Destiny, the European Research Laboratory Columbus, and the Japanese Experiment Module Kibo (Hope). Each was launched separately and connected in space by astronauts.

The ISS weighs 924,739 lbs (419,456 kilograms)

Habitable Volume: 13,696 cubic feet (388 cubic meters)

Solar Array Length: 239.4 feet (73 meters)

There have been 180 spacewalks conducted in support of space station assembly, totaling almost 1,130 hours.

The space station has been visited by 214 individuals.

According to Johnson Space Center, as of August 2014, there have been 151 launches to the space station: 98 Russian vehicles, 37 space shuttles, seven U.S. commercial vehicles, five European vehicles and four Japanese vehicles.

On its tenth anniversary (November 2, 2010), the ISS is estimated to have made 57,361 orbits around the earth.

via International Space Station Fast Facts – CNN.com.

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Since the International Space Station has been in the news recently and is the host of several successful ISS to school programs, I thought it appropriate to list some of the basic facts and figures associated with this space platform orbiting above us.  Thanks to CNN and NASA for the  article.

For the latest in Amateur Radio News and Events, be sure to check the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Until next time,

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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