Ofcom discuss Pocket Spacecraft


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Page last updated on: Thursday, November 27, 2014

 

 

Ofcom discuss Pocket Spacecraft

On Wednesday, November 26, Michael Johnson M0MJJ discussed the licensing of thousands of Pocket Spacecraft with the UK communications regulator Ofcom.

The plan is that a 3U CubeSat will carry Pocket Spacecraft known as ‘Scouts’ to the Moon. A ‘Scout’ is a disk with flexible electronics, smaller than a CD, containing a transceiver, antenna and solar cells. The CubeSat should first release a batch of the wafer thin Scout satellites into Earth orbit and then deploy another batch of the Scout satellites into Lunar orbit.

It is understood the mission plans to use the 435 MHz and 2400 MHz bands.

Pocket Spacecraft

http://pocketspacecraft.com/

Follow Pocket Spacecraft on Twitter @mySpacecraft

UK radio ham’s Lunar CubeSat to go ahead

http://amsat-uk.org/2013/08/26/uk-radio-hams-lunar-cubesat-to-go-ahead/

BBC: ‘Pocket spacecrafts’ to become a reality

http://amsat-uk.org/2014/05/15/bbc-pocket-spacecrafts-to-become-a-reality/

via Ofcom discuss Pocket Spacecraft.

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Fascinating concept to put miniature “Scout” satellites into a lunar orbit. The wafer thin pocket spacecraft will contain an antenna, transceiver, and solar cells.  The “Scouts” will use the 435 MHz and 2400 MHz amateur radio bands for communications.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Ofcom decision to make airwaves available for mobile broadband services


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Page last updated on: Wednesday, November 19, 2014

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Ofcom decision to make airwaves available for mobile broadband services

Ofcom has today published a decision to make valuable airwaves available for mobile broadband services, while securing the future of digital terrestrial TV.

The decision allows mobile network operators to deliver mobile broadband using some of the frequencies currently used for digital terrestrial TV services, such as Freeview, and wireless microphones. These frequencies make up the 700 MHz frequency band.

As a result, consumers and businesses should get faster and cheaper mobile data services, while viewers can continue to enjoy the free-to-view TV services they value without another ‘switchover’. Ofcom’s objective is to make this happen by the beginning of 2022, and possibly up to two years earlier.

Ofcom will also ensure that users of wireless microphones in the programme making and special events sector, such as theatres, sports venues and music events, continue to have access to the airwaves they need to deliver their important cultural benefits.

 

via Ofcom decision to make airwaves available for mobile broadband services.

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Keep your eye on this development to accommodate broadband services in the UK.  Our own FCC could do likewise in the future.  Although 700 MHz is the targeted spectrum, other bands in the UHF range are also being considered for broadband services–there’s been a lot of discussion about the future of 2.5 GHZ, 3.4 GHz, and higher bands.  Use it or lose it.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

146 MHz allocation for UK Full license holders. Post #4579


Source:  Southgate Amateur Radio Club News.

Summary:

The UK telecommunications authority, Ofcom, has issued a statement setting out plans for the release and allocation of spectrum returned to civil use by the Emergency Services.

Article excerpts:

The statement set out Ofcom’s decision for portions of the 5.875 MHz of the Very High Frequency (VHF) spectrum in the 143-169 MHz band.  Ofcom believes this spectrum will be of most interest to business radio users, such as utility and construction companies.

The spectrum will be made available on a first-come-first- served basis.  However, it will also be released through a managed and gradual approach in order to maintain maximum flexibility for the band in the future, should new types of demand emerge.

As part of the process, Ofcom will also allocate and license spectrum to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency to replace channels no longer available due to changes in international frequency arrangements.

This approach will not require the use of all available spectrum immediately, therefore, some of this spectrum will be made available on a “temporary basis”, for amateur radio at 146.0-147.0 MHz and Ofcom will continue to provide short term access to Programme Making and Special Events users.

Subject to some geographical restrictions, Full License holders will gain access to the new allocation via a Notice of Variation (NoV), which should be available via the RSGB website from the end of November.

You can read the full Ofcom statement at:  http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/vhf-143-169mhz/statement/VHF_Release_statement.pdf.

There were more responses to the consultation from CB enthusiasts wanting a VHF allocation than responses from radio amateurs.  You can read the responses at:  http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/vhf-143-169mhz/?showResponses=true.

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Comment:

It’s interesting to note that “there were more responses to the consultation from CB enthusiasts wanting a VHF allocation than responses from radio amateurs.”  This tells it all.  If you want to keep some spectrum for amateur radio purposes, speak up.  Apparently, the silence was deafening or perhaps UK hams felt “resistance is futile” (a quote from “Star Trek–Next Generation“).  How can one blame Ofcom for the frequency cuts when only a few amateur radio operators take the time to speak out?  Ofcom, like our own FCC, is facing intense pressure to surrender spectrum to the growing trend in broadband internet, digital transmissions, and expanded public service use of VHF and UHF frequencies.  Beware of the law of unintended consequences.  Use it or lose it.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Thursday, October 9, 2014

Source: Southgate Amateur Radio Club News.

 

Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band

Ofcom has today granted an indefinite extension to the spectrum licence held by UK Broadband Ltd within the 3.4 GHz band.

The decision follows a consultation, which considered the benefits to consumers that are likely to arise if the licence is extended and UK Broadband goes ahead with investment in a new broadband network.

Ofcom believes that extending the licence will promote competition and encourage investment and innovation. Among the potential benefits, we expect UK Broadband’s investment to deliver faster broadband speeds to customers and at lower prices, in under-served urban areas.

UK Broadband’s licence includes 40 MHz of spectrum within a total of 190 MHz of spectrum suitable for broadband use in the 3.4 GHz band.

The future auction of the other 150 MHz of spectrum at 3.4 GHz means that alternative operators will still have an opportunity to obtain spectrum in this band.

via Ofcom grants extension to UK Broadband Ltd’s spectrum licence within the 3.4 GHz band | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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The rising demand for broadband spectrum is squeezing amateur radio operators in both the U.S. and the UK out of shared frequencies in the 3.4 GHz band. In its consultation report, UK telecommunications regulator, Ofcom, said the reassignment of 3.4 GHz spectrum will encourage “investment and innovation” in delivering high-speed internet to customers in “underserved urban areas.”  UK Broadband’s license “includes 40 MHz of spectrum with a total of 190 MHz of spectrum suitable for broadband use in the 3.4 GHz band.”  This competition for available spectrum reminds me of the frequency battles of the early 1920’s when commercial services tried to assume control over spectrum granted to amateur radio operators.  A good account of this struggle can be found in Clinton DeSoto’s book, “200 Meters and Down.”  It appears history is repeating itself, but this time the struggle has moved from HF to the UHF and SHF bands.  Just follow the money trail.  Enjoy the spectrum you have–it may be taken away anytime by something more important, such as mobile phones, mobile gaming, high-speed internet, or even vehicle avoidance radar.  I have a weird feeling that amateur radio may be returning to the MW and LF ranges one of these days, as AM broadcast radio is phased out in favor of 88-108 MHz FM stations.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Radio Hams can encrypt, in emergencies, according to Ofcom. Post #4494.


Source:  “The Register” (UK), dated 15 September 2014.

Summary:

Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed license conditions for UK amateur radio operators.

Article excerpt:

UK regulator Ofcom is looking for radio hams‘ opinions about proposed changes to spectrum and amateur licensing.

In exchange for giving up some spectrum, hams are getting access to new spectrum in the 470 kHz and 5MHz bands that the Ministry of Defense is happy for them to use.  Users of that spectrum will have to quit if the Ministry says they’re causing interference.

Access to these bands has been made available by way of compensation after an April Ofcom decision to withdraw spectrum in the 2350-2390 MHz and 3410-3475 MHz bands (access remains in the  2310-2350 MHz, 2390-2400 MHz and 3400-3410 MHz bands.).

The 2350-2390 and 3410-3475 MHz bands will be auctioned off.

Recognizing the role of amateur radio users in emergencies, the consultation proposes changing the license condition that state that hams can only communicate with other hams.  Where a license-holder is participating in a rescue operation (for example as part of the Radio Amateurs’ Emergency Network, RAYNET) he/she will be allowed to talk to others, such as rescue teams involved in an emergency operation.

Ofcom also proposes permitting encryption for hams involve in RAYNET operations.  Currently, encryption is forbidden, which creates a problem if an incident commander asks for encryption.

The consultation also seeks comment on Ofcom proposals to add license conditions that ensure that a callsign assigned to an amateur radio club remains with that club; a relaxation of the requirement that amateurs are automatically revoked if they don’t revalidate their licenses every five years; and the relaxation of the demand that users transmit their callsigns every 15 minutes.

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For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated throughout the day.

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Thanks for joining us today!

Until next time,

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

 

 

DMR in Amateur Radio – Ofcom awfully impressed!


See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

The Timeslots and Talkgroups newsletter reports on the reaction of three Ofcom officials who attended an amateur radio DMR Workshop in Kent (DMR in Amateur Radio – Ofcom awfully impressed!

Russ Roberts‘s insight:

It seem Ofcom (the UK equivalent of the FCC in the USA) was “awfully impressed” by a recent demonstration of DMR–a digital radio mode that enables 2 channel TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) communications.  Hopefully, communications regulators in the UK and in the USA will be a little more forgiving of amateur radio experiments with DMR in the rapidly decreasing amateur allocations in the  2.3 GHz and 3.4 GHz bands.  Try to remain positive.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on www.southgatearc.org

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