Propagation de K7RA


Propagation de K7RA.

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No trip to your ham shack would be complete without checking the propagation forecast from Tad Cook (K7RA).  Tom and his worldwide network of volunteers deliver an accurate and timely report of solar weather conditions, so you can make the most efficient use of your time behind the mic or key.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar. These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Please excuse the lack of reports this week–my trusty HP Pavilion Slimline PC lost a power supply earlier this week and I’ve been using an older Compaq PC to maintain my various Hawaii news and Amateur Radio blogs.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Old Sunspot Returns


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Page last updated on: Thursday, November 13, 2014

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Old Sunspot Returns

Space Weather reports late last month, the biggest sunspot in nearly 25 years crossed the face of the sun, blasting Earth’s upper atmosphere with dozens of solar flares. Its name was AR2192, and now it’s back

The old sunspot is emerging over the sun’s southeastern limb following two weeks on the farside of the sun. See the website for a movie from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.

In late October, AR2192 unleashed 6 X-class solar flares and many more M-class flares. Strong HF radio blackouts were a daily occurance, and millions of people glimpsed the sunspot during a partial solar eclipse.

For the past two weeks, the behemoth sunspot has been transiting the farside of the sun. During that time it probably decayed. Even if it retains only a fraction of its former vigor, however, it could still bring a significant uptick in solar activity when it fully emerges in the days ahead.

Space Weather

http://spaceweather.com/

via Old Sunspot Returns.

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Excellent article from the Southgate Amateur Radio Club.  It seems as if the huge sunspot known as AR2192 is turning its face again towards Earth.  This large area of the sun’s surface generated several M-class and X-class solar flares the last time it faced our planet.  Let’s hope that a major CME doesn’t occur.  A CME could cause disruption in HF radio propagation and interfere with satellites and solid state equipment.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Another X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News


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Page last updated on: Saturday, October 25, 2014

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Another X-flare

Space Weather reports a giant sunspot AR2192 erupted again on Oct. 24 at 21:40 UT, producing a powerful X3-class solar flare

Using a backyard solar telescope, Sergio Castillo of Corona, California, was monitoring the sunspot when it exploded, his picture can be seen on the Space Weather page.

“This flare was so intense that it almost shorted out my computer!

Well … not really,” says Castillo, “but I knew right away that it was an

X-class eruption.”

A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the flare ionized the upper layers of Earth’s atmosphere, causing a brief but strong blackout of HF radio communications over the dayside of Earth. Such blackouts may be noticed by amateur radio operators, aviators, and mariners.

Coronagraph data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) suggest that the explosion did not hurl a significant CME toward our planet. (Interestinngly, none of the X-flares from this active region has so far produced a major CME.) As a result, Earth-effects may be limited to the radio blackout.

Space Weather

http://spaceweather.com/

via Another X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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It seems large sunspot AR2192 is producing both X-class and M-class solar flares.  These flares have caused temporary blackouts of HF radio communications.  Coronograph data from the SOHO satellite “suggest that the explosion did not hurl a significant CME toward our planet.”  We escaped the proverbial “bullet” again.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ  (KH6JRM).

Lots of solar flares | Southgate Amateur Radio News


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Page last updated on: Thursday, October 23, 2014

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Lots of solar flares

Space Weather report solar activity is high. In just 48 hours, monster sunspot AR2192 has produced a series of seven M-class solar flares of increasing intensity

The eruptions crossed the threshold into X-territory with an X1-class flare on Oct. 22nd. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded a powerful flash of extreme UV radiation in the sunspot’s magnetic canopy at 14:30 UT.

Remarkably, not one of the explosions so far has hurled a significant CME toward Earth. The primary effect of the flares has been to ionize Earth’s upper atmosphere, causing a series of short-lived HF radio communications blackouts. Such blackouts may be noticed by amateur radio operators, aviators, and mariners.

Earth-effects could increase in the days ahead. AR2192 has an unstable ‘beta-gamma-delta’ magnetic field that harbors energy for powerful explosions, and the active region is turning toward Earth. NOAA forecasters estimate at 65% chance of M-class flares and a 20% chance of X-flares during the next 24 hours.

Space Weather

http://spaceweather.com/

 

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via Lots of solar flares | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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This could be an interesting propagation week for both amateur radio operators and commercial broadcasters.  According to Space Weather, sunspot AR2192 has produced at least 7 M-class solar flares.  More flares may be on the way.  So far, the only effect has been a temporary interruption of HF communications lasting only a few hours.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Propagation Report from Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Saturday, October 18, 2014

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Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP

Propagation Report from

Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP

19 October, 2014

Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP, reports that the expected solar activity will be at moderate

levels with a chance of M-class solar flares.

If you want to do your own frequency predictions, the expected effective sunspot number for the week will be around 105.

The 20 to 10m bands will provide lots of DX fun with some exciting 10m openings in the pipeline

Please visit the website http://spaceweather.sansa.org.za for further information

South African Radio League

• All propagation reports can be found at:

http://www.southgatearc.org/propagation

 

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via Propagation Report from Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

Another one of the useful HF propagation tools is the column authored by South African ham, Hannes Coetzee (ZS6BZP).  Hannes says “Solar activity will be at moderate levels with a chance of M-class solar flares.” The rounded sunspot number will be 105.  Hannes adds that good DX opportunities will be found from 20 through 10 meters.  Hannes also provides two helpful space weather links.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less.: Solar Flares and CMEs


W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less.: Solar Flares and CMEs.

Larry Makoski (W2LJ) presents an interesting NASA video describing Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).  You can view the short video by visiting http://w2lj.blogspot.com/2014/10/solar-flares-and-cmes.html.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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