Propagation de K7RA


Propagation de K7RA.

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No trip to your ham shack would be complete without checking the propagation forecast from Tad Cook (K7RA).  Tom and his worldwide network of volunteers deliver an accurate and timely report of solar weather conditions, so you can make the most efficient use of your time behind the mic or key.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar. These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Please excuse the lack of reports this week–my trusty HP Pavilion Slimline PC lost a power supply earlier this week and I’ve been using an older Compaq PC to maintain my various Hawaii news and Amateur Radio blogs.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Japanese space probe, observatory record huge sunspot activity – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun


THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Images of a sunspot cluster 66 times the size of Earth were released by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on Nov. 19.

The solar observation probe Hinode and NAOJ took pictures of the sunspots from Oct. 16 to Oct. 30, before the sun’s rotation obstructed the view. The sunspot cluster could be seen again on Nov. 15, but it had shrunk to one-third of its peak size on Oct. 26.

Sunspots appear in big clusters when the sun is most active. Large solar flares, a phenomenon triggered by sunspot activity, were also observed on the surface of the sun on six occasions in October.

Solar activity intensifies and then decreases over an 11-year cycle, according to the observatory. The sun currently appears to be in one of the most active phases of that cycle, they said.

The last time such a huge sunspot appeared was in 1990. That sunspot was 74 times the size of Earth and was observed over a four-month period.

THE ASAHI SHIMBUN astronomysunNational Astronomical Observatory of JapanJAXAsunspotssolar activity

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via Japanese space probe, observatory record huge sunspot activity – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun.

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This brief announcement from the Japanese newspaper “Ashai Shinbun” should prepare us for more solar activity.  These sunspots seem capable of generating large solar flares, which could disrupt communications on Earth. Scientists are concerned about solar flares, because much of our technological infrastructure is super sensitive to solar radiation.  A “Carrington Event”, such as the one in 1859, could render much of our solid state electronics inoperable. Potential damage could be extended to medical devices, transportation vehicles, and power generation.  My Drake TR-4 still works. Do you have a backup tube rig in case your state of the art transceiver is “fried”?

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Another X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News


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Page last updated on: Saturday, October 25, 2014

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Another X-flare

Space Weather reports a giant sunspot AR2192 erupted again on Oct. 24 at 21:40 UT, producing a powerful X3-class solar flare

Using a backyard solar telescope, Sergio Castillo of Corona, California, was monitoring the sunspot when it exploded, his picture can be seen on the Space Weather page.

“This flare was so intense that it almost shorted out my computer!

Well … not really,” says Castillo, “but I knew right away that it was an

X-class eruption.”

A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the flare ionized the upper layers of Earth’s atmosphere, causing a brief but strong blackout of HF radio communications over the dayside of Earth. Such blackouts may be noticed by amateur radio operators, aviators, and mariners.

Coronagraph data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) suggest that the explosion did not hurl a significant CME toward our planet. (Interestinngly, none of the X-flares from this active region has so far produced a major CME.) As a result, Earth-effects may be limited to the radio blackout.

Space Weather

http://spaceweather.com/

via Another X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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It seems large sunspot AR2192 is producing both X-class and M-class solar flares.  These flares have caused temporary blackouts of HF radio communications.  Coronograph data from the SOHO satellite “suggest that the explosion did not hurl a significant CME toward our planet.”  We escaped the proverbial “bullet” again.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ  (KH6JRM).

Big sunspot produces X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Sunday, October 19, 2014

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Big sunspot produces X-flare

Solar activity increased sharply on Oct. 19th when huge sunspot AR2192 unleashed an X1-class solar flare.

The blast produced an HF radio blackout on the dayside of Earth and it likely hurled a CME into space.

Check http://spaceweather.com for pictures of the flare and more information about possible Earth-effects.

 

via Big sunspot produces X-flare | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Apparently, the sun has begun the week with a Class X-flare that “produced an HF radio blackout on the dayside of Earth and it likely hurled a CME into space.”  You can visit http://spaceweather.com for more details.  Things could get dicey on 10 meters.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Propagation Report from Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Saturday, October 18, 2014

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Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP

Propagation Report from

Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP

19 October, 2014

Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP, reports that the expected solar activity will be at moderate

levels with a chance of M-class solar flares.

If you want to do your own frequency predictions, the expected effective sunspot number for the week will be around 105.

The 20 to 10m bands will provide lots of DX fun with some exciting 10m openings in the pipeline

Please visit the website http://spaceweather.sansa.org.za for further information

South African Radio League

• All propagation reports can be found at:

http://www.southgatearc.org/propagation

 

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via Propagation Report from Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

Another one of the useful HF propagation tools is the column authored by South African ham, Hannes Coetzee (ZS6BZP).  Hannes says “Solar activity will be at moderate levels with a chance of M-class solar flares.” The rounded sunspot number will be 105.  Hannes adds that good DX opportunities will be found from 20 through 10 meters.  Hannes also provides two helpful space weather links.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

A big sunspot emerges | Southgate Amateur Radio News


Page last updated on: Friday, October 17, 2014

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A big sunspot emerges

A large and active sunspot is emerging over the sun’s southeastern limb.

Only two to three days ago, this active region unleashed multiple flares and hurled a massive CME over the edge of the sun.

If these eruptions continue apace, solar activity could sharply increase in the days ahead as the sunspot turns to face Earth.

Visit http://spaceweather.com for photos and updates.

via A big sunspot emerges | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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This could be good news for 10 meter and 6 meter enthusiasts.  Follow the latest propagation forecast from K7RA to get the details.  There might be some good DX coming in the days ahead.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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