146 MHz allocation for UK Full license holders. Post #4579


Source:  Southgate Amateur Radio Club News.

Summary:

The UK telecommunications authority, Ofcom, has issued a statement setting out plans for the release and allocation of spectrum returned to civil use by the Emergency Services.

Article excerpts:

The statement set out Ofcom’s decision for portions of the 5.875 MHz of the Very High Frequency (VHF) spectrum in the 143-169 MHz band.  Ofcom believes this spectrum will be of most interest to business radio users, such as utility and construction companies.

The spectrum will be made available on a first-come-first- served basis.  However, it will also be released through a managed and gradual approach in order to maintain maximum flexibility for the band in the future, should new types of demand emerge.

As part of the process, Ofcom will also allocate and license spectrum to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency to replace channels no longer available due to changes in international frequency arrangements.

This approach will not require the use of all available spectrum immediately, therefore, some of this spectrum will be made available on a “temporary basis”, for amateur radio at 146.0-147.0 MHz and Ofcom will continue to provide short term access to Programme Making and Special Events users.

Subject to some geographical restrictions, Full License holders will gain access to the new allocation via a Notice of Variation (NoV), which should be available via the RSGB website from the end of November.

You can read the full Ofcom statement at:  http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/vhf-143-169mhz/statement/VHF_Release_statement.pdf.

There were more responses to the consultation from CB enthusiasts wanting a VHF allocation than responses from radio amateurs.  You can read the responses at:  http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/vhf-143-169mhz/?showResponses=true.

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Comment:

It’s interesting to note that “there were more responses to the consultation from CB enthusiasts wanting a VHF allocation than responses from radio amateurs.”  This tells it all.  If you want to keep some spectrum for amateur radio purposes, speak up.  Apparently, the silence was deafening or perhaps UK hams felt “resistance is futile” (a quote from “Star Trek–Next Generation“).  How can one blame Ofcom for the frequency cuts when only a few amateur radio operators take the time to speak out?  Ofcom, like our own FCC, is facing intense pressure to surrender spectrum to the growing trend in broadband internet, digital transmissions, and expanded public service use of VHF and UHF frequencies.  Beware of the law of unintended consequences.  Use it or lose it.

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Radio Hams can encrypt, in emergencies, according to Ofcom. Post #4494.


Source:  “The Register” (UK), dated 15 September 2014.

Summary:

Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed license conditions for UK amateur radio operators.

Article excerpt:

UK regulator Ofcom is looking for radio hams‘ opinions about proposed changes to spectrum and amateur licensing.

In exchange for giving up some spectrum, hams are getting access to new spectrum in the 470 kHz and 5MHz bands that the Ministry of Defense is happy for them to use.  Users of that spectrum will have to quit if the Ministry says they’re causing interference.

Access to these bands has been made available by way of compensation after an April Ofcom decision to withdraw spectrum in the 2350-2390 MHz and 3410-3475 MHz bands (access remains in the  2310-2350 MHz, 2390-2400 MHz and 3400-3410 MHz bands.).

The 2350-2390 and 3410-3475 MHz bands will be auctioned off.

Recognizing the role of amateur radio users in emergencies, the consultation proposes changing the license condition that state that hams can only communicate with other hams.  Where a license-holder is participating in a rescue operation (for example as part of the Radio Amateurs’ Emergency Network, RAYNET) he/she will be allowed to talk to others, such as rescue teams involved in an emergency operation.

Ofcom also proposes permitting encryption for hams involve in RAYNET operations.  Currently, encryption is forbidden, which creates a problem if an incident commander asks for encryption.

The consultation also seeks comment on Ofcom proposals to add license conditions that ensure that a callsign assigned to an amateur radio club remains with that club; a relaxation of the requirement that amateurs are automatically revoked if they don’t revalidate their licenses every five years; and the relaxation of the demand that users transmit their callsigns every 15 minutes.

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For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated throughout the day.

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Thanks for joining us today!

Until next time,

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

 

 

90th Anniversary of first UK-NZ contact – Southgate Amateur Radio Club


Southgate Amateur Radio Club
90th Anniversary of first UK-NZ contact
Southgate Amateur Radio Club
Then the teams will be returning to the site on Saturday 11th October to complete the antenna installation and start installing the radio equipment.

Source: www.southgatearc.org

Relive a bit of amateur radio history between 11-18 October 2014 as NZART observes the 90th anniversary of the first two-way communication between the UK and New Zealand.  On 18 October 1924, Frank Bell (4AA) in Shag Valley, South Island, NZ hooked up with Cecil Goyder who was operating The Mill Hill School station 2SZ.  NZART describes the contact as “an event that changed radio communications forever as it established new and initially, little understood ‘rules’ for short wave broadcasting.”  Antenna installation begins on Sunday, 04 October 2014.  The station will be active between 11 October 2014 and 18 October 2014.  For details, visit http://www.ZL4AA.org.nz/.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

White space between TV signals could save lives at sea.


Source:  Southgate Amateur Radio Club.

According to the BBC, the leftover white space between TV signals is raising the hope of saving lives at sea and providing broadband for remote communities.  Coast Guard stations in the UK have been using the same VHF technologies for years, with coverage problems created the line-of-sight properties of the VHF marine bands.  Jeremy Blake, a coxswain of the Freshwater Independent lifeboat group, tells the BBC, the technology works fairly well , “but we’re still limited by line of sight…we can only have one-way communication at a time, and if someone else is talking on the radio that will drown us out if they’ve got a stronger signal.”  That situation will change shortly as the lifeboat group has been an active participant of a new technology that supporters say could not only save lives but bring superfast broadband to rural communities that so far have been cut off from the information age.”  The new technology uses something called “White Space” and takes advantage of unused parts of the spectrum reserved for television transmissions.  Thanks to Stephen (G7VFY) for the story.  For details, visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-28957172.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

BBC-TV to present Radar Docu-drama.


Source:  Southgate Amateur Radio Club.

The BBC program will be aired Thursday, 04 September 2014 under the title “Castles In The Sky.”  The program tells the remarkable story of the fight to develop RADAR by Robert Watson-Watt and a team of UK scientists. The program “aims to convey the genuine human drama behind the invention which saved the nation in the Battle of Britain.”  Just a note:  Overseas viewers who see the program via the internet may need a UK-based proxy server.  After 04 September 2014, the program will be available for internet broadcast at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04gnhv7.  This sounds like a fascinating program.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

EMF 2014: It Takes an Amateur Radio Village – ARRL


EMF 2014: It Takes an Amateur Radio Village
ARRL
Special event station GB2EMF will operate from the Amateur Radio Village. Campers’ identification tags consist of a “fun piece of technology” that attendees can take home and use following the event.

Source: www.arrl.org

If you’ll be in the UK during the last week of August, you may want to check out “EMF 2014”.  The ARRL calls “EMF 2014” a “festival for anyone interested in radio, electronics, space, homebrewing, robots, UAVs, 3D Printing, DIYBio, Internet Culture, or pretty much anything else you can think of.”  The event will feature an Amateur Radio Village and special event station GB2EMF.  The “EMF 2014” event will be held just south of Bletchley, UK, Friday through Sunday, 29-31 August 2014.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

30th Chelmsford Amateur Radio Foundation Course – Southgate Amateur Radio Club


Southgate Amateur Radio Club
30th Chelmsford Amateur Radio Foundation Course
Southgate Amateur Radio Club
30th Chelmsford Amateur Radio Foundation Course.

Source: www.southgatearc.org

Residents of the UK desiring to qualify for the Foundation Amateur Radio License are urged to register for the Foundation training course offered by the Chelmsford Amateur Radio Society (CARS).  The course begins on 04 September 2014 and will be held at the Danbury Village Hall.  The basic course consists of 6 Thursday evening sessions which blend theory with practical applications.  For details, visit http://www.g0mwt.org.uk/training.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

See on Scoop.itKH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog

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